Berry Brothers & Rudd

Fine Wine and Spirits Merchant, Berry Brothers & Rudd, who have an office in Singapore, held a Grand Portfolio Tasting this August.

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Champagnes & Whites
Amongst the wines tasted, I enjoyed the Thienot Brut for its texture, fruit and ready characters – every bit an excellent Champagne for $95. The house brand Berry’s UKC Rose Grand Cru Marguet was a surprise – many pink Champagnes show good fruit but lack the minerality – but this one has it all.

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How about a 2014 Tavel Rose, Prier de Montezargues – warm, lush with red fruit – and flavours that brought me back to Southern France – and all for $39.
Then there is also a perfumed and beautifully balanced 2012 Domaine de la Renjarde Cotes du Rhone Villages Blanc, similarly priced and every bit as enjoyable.
For oysters and cold seafood – nothing like a crispy lemon-lime pith flavoured 2013 Muscadet sur lie, Domaine la Haute Fevrie ‘Excellence’ – $35 – why look elsewhere?
I also tasted a Benjamin Lerous Auxey Duresses Blanc, a Philippe Colin Chassagne ‘Chevenottes’, a Mirum Verdicchio di Materica Riserva, Mas de Dumas Gassac Blanc and a  sweet Churn Petit Manseng – all delicious.

Reds
So many wines, so little time to taste (1 hours hour had gone by already and 1 hour left…). Red wines I enjoyed were the Olivier Bernstein 2009 Chambolle ‘Les Lavrottes’ as well as the 2003 Collection Bellenum Camille ‘Derriere la Grange’ – both 1er crus of course- yet if you could put gender to the wines, the former was masculine whilst the other, womanly. And for $295 there is a lovely 2003 Louis Remi Latricieres Chambertin – silky, juicy and structured – price wise, its not over the top for a Grand Cru…

Spanish wine lovers should not miss the Riu Trio Infernal by three French winemakers Combier-Fischer-Gerin ( from Crozes Hermitage, Provence and Cote-Rotie respectively) – who decided to make a Grenache-Carignan blend. Its a solid, Priorat big bodied, ripe, powerful yet fruity and balanced, velvety wine – and very good – I say that after having tasting over 35 Spanish wines the previous day.

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Two other wines I loved – the 2008 Paje Roagna Barbaresco – delicate and complex at the same time; and the NZ  2011 Churton Pinot – with beautiful fruit and texture, yet not overtly fruity like many NZ and New World Pinots; rather with some Burgundian restraint and structure.

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Fortified & Others
An oxidised, nutty with good lingering acidity wine form the Jura – the 2010 Domaine Grand  Cotes du Jura Savagnin – was calling out for some Lobster Amoricaine to accompany.

And to end – well, a Berry’s William Pickering 20 year old Tawny which I am told is a Quinta da Noval cuvee – with nuts and red fruit in the forefront and delectable sweetness and complexity.  Wait- there was also a Madeira – the Berry’s Rainwater 5 year old Medium dry that was lush and gushing with Chinese New Year fruit – preserved longan, dried plums and the like.

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I enjoy the occasional aged rum and here before me, just near the exit, were five rums that heralded a taste. I promptly got the required portions poured out and retreated to a corner of the room for a taste of the amazingly unique rums. Here are the notes – some descriptors given by a few passerby’s that decided to partake as well…

2000 Berry’s Own Selection Guyana Rum 15 year old – crispy crushed mixed fruit, raisins, plums and all.
NV Berry’s Own Selection Jamaican Rum Genex 13 year old – forward notes of bush salad, overripe pineapple and tropical fruit
NV Berry’s Own Fijian Rum – Lots of wood – raw pine with nangka, jackfruit, over the top pungency – totally characterful
NV The Pink Pigeon, Mauritian Rum – Creme caramel, balanced, sweet and smooth – will woo whisky and cognac drinkers over
NV Berry’s Own Selection Barbados Rum 10 year old – Fruit, caramel, glutinous rice, dates and some sea salt
( Note: for newly converted rum lovers – like myself – Berry’s offers other rums  – from Haiti, Guadeloupe, Nicaragua, Venezuela and more – imagine having these with single estate chocolates such as those from Amedei)

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After, I looked forlornly at the other spirits yet to be tasted – the Pot Distilled Junipero Gin,  the Hophead Vodka and Karlssons Gold Vodka from Sweden –  but I had had enough for the day – they would have to be tasted next time.

A Krug Unforgettable Journey at Jann

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“To enjoy Krug, you have to understand that there is no hierarchy in our wines,” said Olivier Krug recently at dinner held at Jaan. “We make two cuvées and they both get the same care. True, one cuvée may be more expensive because it’s a single expression of one year and it is rarer.”

The affable and well spoken Krug continued, “When we make a cuvée, it is the ‘blend of the best’  and it is re-created each year – you realise that it is never the same each year but the best possible quality that exhibits the full spectrum of flavours.  Unlike other houses, we ferment as many as 250 different grower plots separately. We taste each of the ‘plots’ and added to that, 150 other reserve wines (as old as 15 years) each year –  to create (blend up) the best possible cuvée each year. This is unlike many others who ferment all that they obtain from various growers/vineyards together.”

He explained, “Cuvée 1 is the Grand Cuvée which we have been making since 1948. Cuvée 2 or the Krug Vintage – composed of wines from a single year which is the ‘fullest expression of the year’. And there’s the single plot wines. After tasting plots for the cuvées, my ancestor/great great great grandfather Joseph Krug noticed that quality of the wine from the single vineyard (over eight years) was consistently good / special and one day decided to keep it aside and bottle it – hence the Clos Du Mesnil.  We also have a Clos d’Ambonnay (single vintage, single vineyard) and a Rosé.”

As we savoured our dinner over various bottles –  Clos du Mesnil 2002 and 2003, Krug 2003, Krug Grand Cuvée and Krug Rosé, Olivier Krug left us with with a few updates (he was heading off to the post launch party of Singapore’s Michelin guide)…

“Music and champagne go so well together – we realised that there is an increasing amount of research recognizing the considerable changes hearing can make to the tasting experience, such as the work carried out by Charles Spence and Janice Qian Wang of Oxford University’s Crossmodal Research Laboratory. As such, we are collaborating with various musicians to pair music with our wines.”

“We are very pleased about our Krug iD, a six-digit number on the back label of each bottle, allows you to identify your bottle by revealing its unique story, as told by our Krug Cellar Master. You just need to enter the Krug iD online, via krug.com or the Krug App!”

“A little advice – please do not use the flute- drinking Champagne from a flute is like going to an opera and using earplugs. Instead, enjoy your champagne in a white Burgundy wine glass or our ‘Joseph’ glass. See you in Champagne soon!”

 

My notes:

Clos du Mesnil 2002 – butter, caramel, velvety mousse, long with mandarin orange peel, pomegranate, buah duku and finishing with smoke and lime nuances

Clos du Mesnil 2003 – smoke, vanilla toast, lon gmid paate, minerals and complex with slightly bigger bubbles and a bittersweet big long finish

Rosé – salmon pink, complex nose with a delicate mousse and velvety texture. Small red fruit, minerals, chalk, mangosteens and long.

Bruno Paillard launches the Rosé NPU 2003 in Singapore

Mr. Bruno Paillard, unlike other Champenoise, started his estate only in 1981, at the age of 27 and with a fistful of French Francs (about 15,000 Euros, I believe). He did come from a family with a connection to the land – they were brokers and growers in the two Grands Crus villages of Bouzy and Verzenay, dating back to 1704.

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Paillard, over a lunch at les Amis, described Champagne’s terroir, “… it’s the savoir faire of the producers and growers combined with the unique conditions – Nordic climate, sealife sediment in the soils and four marked seasons – that makes Champagne what it is.”

“The term ‘Non-Vintage’ sounds so negative. I prefer the term MV or ‘Multi-Vintage’ and you could say we were the first to use this term. It best describes how we make our wine – We use a solera style system of reserve wines so every wine you get is a blend of older vintages. To do this well, we store our reserves cuvee by cuvee rather than by vineyard. We also age our wine longer than most other houses,” states Paillard.  “Naturally, all our wines carry the date of ‘degorgement’,” he continued.

Champagne aficionados will be familiar with N.P.U. – another term that Paillard came up with. In latin, N.P.U. or ‘Nec Plus Ultra’ means ‘there is nothing beyond’. Certainly a highly ambitious statement.

Bruno Paillard’s first NPU was a 1990, released in 2002.  Only Grands Cru village grapes are selected; first pressings are only used,  the wine was aged in small oak barrels and the wine is matured in the bottle, on lees for at least a decade; after which the wine is returned to the cellar following degorgement. Hence an NPU is always at least 12 years old. Whilst NPU wines made to date have been ultra-luxurious elegant and complex champagnes (11,000 bottles and 500 magnums for each issue), 2016 marks the release of a magnificent rosé – the N.P.U. 2003.

Only 826 bottles of the N.P.U. Rosé 2003 were produced.  The wine is sumptuous and sublime – with aromas of red berries, spices and candied fruit and a generous broad palate and minerals.

Available at Vinum.

Asian Wine Lexicon in Esquire

Wining Asian-Style

Be intimidated no longer; these people are working at making wine more accessible.

BY LESTARI HAIRUL | FEB 23, 2016 | FOOD & DRINK


Image from Wiki Commons

It tastes like a revelation, that’s what it is. That first sip of a Gewürztraminer is magic because everything finally makes sense, and I’m not just drinking it to wash down food. And all it takes is a vocabulary that I can relate to.

But before that, we train our noses. Set on the table is what looks like a perfumer’s kit of several different vials of scents. Edwin Soon one of the three founders of the Asian Wine Lexicon, removes a few vials and dips tester strips in each. We guess almond, specifically the kind you mix in as a powder for a drink; cumin, initially described as an Indian spice; Chinese medicine; and jasmine, or a white flower of some sort.

It goes on for a bit, a fun educational exercise that gets you thinking about what precisely it is that you smell. First, an association appears in your mind—possibly a food or a quality of it—and then with further sniffing, you distil it down to its component, perhaps the right spice or flower, or you might simply describe it as a type of dish that you’ve had before. It’s something that we naturally do since our senses are so tied to memory.

Coincidentally, Jiu Zhuang bar at Dempsey, where we’re at, is the same place where I’d tested the idea of improving your sense of smell to better appreciate the flavour profiles in drink (see the July 2015 issue).

Three of the wines we had; all available at Jiu Zhuang bar. From left: Cusumano Benuara 2013 Nero d’Avola-Syrah, St Paul’s Gewürztraminer ‘Passion’ 2012 

And even more serendipitously perhaps, the tool that we use now to train our sense of smell was also developed by Sandy Blandin, perfume educator and founder of Nose Who Knows. Except instead of the standard perfumer’s kit that contains the common types of scents that can be found in most perfumes, this was made especially for tea, which can also be adapted for wines.

Switching to thinking about the aroma and the flavour profiles through the lens of an Asian gastronomic background somehow makes it all click. Referring to the actual lexicon, which includes both classic and Asian profiles, along with the descriptions of its character, makes the whole experience even more inviting. Now I just want to taste more and more wines just to see if the vocabulary fits.

We had been writing notes on our own, using Asian terms during wine tastings, and then we sat down and thought, ‘Look at what we’re all using!’ We seemed to be doing the same thing, so why not get together and do something,” says Soon.

Together with Jenny Tan and Daniel Chia, the trio spent about two years on research, including once-a-week tastings of wines at Soon’s before they came up with the handy, pocket-sized tool. “It’s not definitive or absolute. It’s there to be a guide, so we have suggested flavour profiles or descriptors, but we’d love it if you could add more too, because every wine is different,” adds Tan.

The Lexicon covers a good list of reds and whites, and though three of the wines we try aren’t listed in it—a Syrah-Nero d’Avola blend by Cusumano Benuara, a Valpolicella blend by Villa Girardi and a Müller Thurgau by Cembra—it’s possible to cross-reference with similar varietals that are in the Lexicon.

But this is precisely why user input is needed, and along with that, the team is also in talks with wine producers to come up collaboratively with specific charts for their wines.

Soon has written the book Pairing Wines with Asian Food, and helpfully, the lexicon has a section on that, too, including pairing suggestions. We polish off the wine with some Chinese classics done incredibly well by the Jiu Zhuang team including a whisky-infused set of xiao long baos and probably the best carrot cake I’ve ever tasted.

This reminds me a lot of a dinner I had much earlier in Newton Circus. Delicious local hawker food and paired not with a Tiger, but with wines for each course.

Cedric Mui of 75CL tastes wine at Newton Circus 

The best of the lot is a close tie for me: sambal stingray from Guan Kee paired with a Parxet Cava and satay from Siti Khadijah Seafood with a Zinfandel from Pedroncelli Winery.

Sounds strange? It works bloody well actually, party in the mouth and so on. Some of the other pairings are a bit of a hit and miss, but these two make so much sense in taste.

Organised by 75CL, the hawker dinner and wine pairing is called a “wine democracy”, an effort by its founder Cedric Mui to make wine more approachable and as easy-drinking in a culture as it is in Europe.

Deconstructing a dish to its component tastes and textures helps when deciding what wine to pair it with, but the problem with dining in an Asian manner is the approach to food.

Compared to having food by courses and matching wine by course, we normally dine with several different dishes to share, with each likely having a conflicting flavour profile, not to mention the multitudes of sauces that could change the taste of the dish.

For instance, we had orh luak (oyster omelette) paired with a Rosé wine and it tasted absolutely horrific—if you first dip a morsel in the accompanying chilli sauce. But taken as it is, the wine and the dish mingled nicely together.

Having the vocabulary to describe and understand wine might be the missing link to making better food pairing choices that will eventually lead to a normalisation of wine drinking locally.

The wine selection at 75CL 

The prices at 75CL are accessible; the guys go direct to the winery bypassing any middleman to get the best value, and by holding future tastings of a similar vein, wine-drinking will likely be perceived as normal as grabbing a beer to go with greasy hawker food.

A few years ago, I saw something very enviable in a San Francisco home, a gorgeous homemade focal point in the kitchen made up of wine corks from many undoubtedly happy evenings conducted with Bacchus.

It may be less possible with the alcohol tax in Singapore, but collecting mountains of corks aside, could we perhaps look to a future of wine imbibed more freely, and not just as a snooty exercise in looking flush?

It’s hardly a sacred mystery privy to only a few, and with these two groups doing their best to spread the education, there might be a rumble in the distance in the evolution of the local drinking and feasting culture.

First published in Esquire Singapore’s February 2016 issue.

History, Evolution & Revolution of Australian wine

A series of tastings held around the world to showcase Australian wines has finally made it to Singapore.
 
Gone are the days when Australian wines are thought of as less complex or interesting as the European counterparts. Today’s Aussie wines have a place in every wine-lover’s cellar.
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Revered favourites such as Hunter Semillon continue to impress… I have yet to taste a Semillon that will rival this wine in terms of its uniqueness. Although still youthful, with a pungency of citrus/laksa leaf/ buah long long and bone-dry acidic tension, Tyrells Vat 1, Semillon 2005 promises to deliver a lanolin-roundness and delicate complexity in another 10-20 years.
 
An personal old favourite, the St. Hallett Old Block Barossa Shiraz has come of age! A frequent pour amongst students at Roseworthy, I recall it to be a fuller-bodied wine with smooth tannins. The 2012 vintage is medium-bodied with fine tannins and a medium-long finish. The wine is complex with a lovely nose of mint, Chinese dried red dates,  sour plums, chocolate with overtones of toasty oak and toffee.
 
Another classic, the Wynns Cooonawarra John Riddoch Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 proved to be worthy of its time-honoured status. Brimming with herbs, black and red fruit, red peppers, hints of bitter herbs, ginseng and dried figs, this wine is concentrated with chewy, sticky tannins and a long finish. This wine will remain a favourite amongst Bordeaux drinkers in a blind tasting line-up.
 
I especially enjoyed the comparison of the St. Hallett with two other Syrah’s/Shiraz.  First is what I would call an Aussie New Wave Syrah producer – the Luke Lambert Yarra Valley Syrah 2015. This cool-climate style wine with berry aromas, attractive cough syrup flavours and a fine grind of black and white pepper is flavoursome and delicate at the same time. I could not believe this was a typical Australian Syrah – the kind that jumps out of the glass and punches you in the face. And no wonder… the producer had aged the wine in 4000-litre foudres, Guigal-Cotes du Rhone fashion.
 
The other Shiraz is the Battle of Bosworth Puritan McLaren Vale Shiraz 2015. Organic, natural with no sulphur added (yes, and perhaps this fore-tells the future of winemaking!) This wine showed a purity of fruit with plums, berries and attractive medicinal overtones. It was delicious, forward-juicy with bittersweet finish and medium tannins.
 
For whites, I enjoyed the sweet-balanced Grosset Alea Clare Valley Riesling 2014. Grosset has always been my Ocker Riesling favourite alongside Pikes, Pewsey Vale, Knappstein and Henschke.
 
A Vasse Felix Premier Margaret River Chardonnay 2014 came across intense with lemon lime, butter-peach and pear with a aftertaste of dried apricots. Medium bodied and with a crisp backbone – ABC drinkers will be surprised indeed!
 
The wine of the tasting was made from Savignin! The BK Wines Skin ‘n Bones Adelaide Hills White 2015 had savoury characteristics with barley overtones and flavours of crushed green grapes and dried fruit. In some ways it was reminiscent of an organic Savignin from Arbois. I felt that with a little more time in the bottle, it might develop those biscuit characteristics that I savoured in an aged bottle of Langhe Chardonnay from a famous Piedmonte producer.
 
The Moorooduc Estate Robinson Mornington Peninsula Pinot Noir 2013, was immensely enjoyable for its beautiful fruit underlined by its hints of pomegranate, chestnuts, cherries and spice. It was juicy, refined with a satin texture and a bittersweet long aftertaste.
 
How far Australian pinots have come! Looking back, 30 years ago, they were mostly over-extracted, lacking in taste (due to over-cropping) or uninteresting (with typical jammy warm climate flavours).
Today, this Pinot can stand alongside some of the tastiest from Martinborough, Willamette and the Ahr.
 
Australia continues experimenting with new varietals. The La Linea Adelaide Hills Tempranillo 2014 is an example.  This wine was juicy-savoury with a nice backbone of tannin. Like European wines, with a little coaxing, the wine opened up to reveal sour cherries with a sweet fruity finish. In a blind tasting, I might have mistaken this wine for a modern-styled Temp-Garnacha blend from Rioja Baja.
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Tips on Sipping, Staying and Playing in Wine Country

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SIP: Lake County is home to more than 30 wineries and 160 growers.  Browse this list of Lake County wineries or printable map.  Or use the discovercaliforniawines.com interactive map to search wineries by amenities such as tours, gardens, picnic areas, food for purchase and more.  A few starters: with four tasting rooms on Main Street, the town of Kelseyville offers a fun, leisurely way to enjoy an afternoon of wine tasting.  And there are about a dozen wineries to discover in and near the volcanic hillsides of the Red Hills American Viticultural Area along with spectacular views of Mt. Konocti, a dormant towering volcano.

STAY: Lake County’s charming accommodation options include small inns and hotels, lakeside cottages, winery properties and even vintage railroad cabooses.  For more information visit lakecountywineries.org or lakecounty.com.

 

PLAY:  Chocolate lovers should check out Wine & Chocolate on Feb. 6.  This charity fundraiser for the Lake County Family Resource Center features Lake County wineries pouring their fabulous wines under one roof as well as wine and olive oil sensory classes.  Another great time to visit Lake County is during the 2016 Lake County Wine Adventure May 20–22.  The Gala kick-off evening May 20 is followed by a two-day passport adventure with 25-plus wineries offering wine, food pairings, music and fun. 

Outdoor enthusiasts will find much to do in Lake County.  A hiker’s paradise, it offers 100 miles of trails to explore including Mt. Konocti County Park, part of the Mendocino National Forest and many more.  Fishing, camping and birding are also popular pursuits here.  Clear Lake was designated as an Important Bird Area by the Audubon Society long ago because it serves as a vital resting spot for migrating birds on the Pacific Flyway.  Take an Eyes of the Wild pontoon boat tour or join the Heron Days Boat Tours this spring (usually April or May), where the local Audubon Society points out Great Blue Herons and other amazing avians.  Biking also is big here, boasting 11 Konocti Trails.

MAKE: Crafty types can draw inspiration visiting California’s first Quilt Trail, featuring 79 painted quilt squares on highly visible barns and buildings throughout Lake County.  Enjoy local wines while learning to paint with oil or join the fun at a Wineglass Painting Party on Jan. 31, just a few of the events offered at the Lake County Wine Studio.

GROW: Lake County is a thriving agricultural area with winegrapes, pears and walnuts as the three main crops.  Most known for Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc, the region’s moderate climate allows a diverse range of other grape varieties to thrive here including Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, Chardonnay, Malbec, Barbera and Syrah.  Sustainable winegrowing efforts are central to Lake County’s approach.  To support and enhance Lake County vineyards, the Lake County Winegrape Commission has two programs to assist growers.  The Master Vigneron Program (MVP) provides education and training to vineyard managers and foremen in leading industry viticultural practices and leadership.  Growers and vintners also participate in the California Sustainable Winegrowing Program to adopt best practices for high wine and grape quality that benefit the environment and community.

EAT: Where winegrapes grow, olives are often found nearby.  Lake County is gaining a reputation for award-winning olive oils.  Discover the products of The Villa Barone, located on a 160-acre ranch that also offers weekend immersion experiences.  Or enjoy olive oil samples, wine tasting, hula hooping and even an olive pit spitting contest at the Kelseyville Olive Festival April 24.

In 2015, Lake County produced 40 percent of the pears that were sold on the fresh market in California.  Taste why they are so popular at the Kelseyville Pear Festival, held the last Saturday of September.  For artisanal goat cheese, visit the Bodega & Yerba Santa Goat Dairy in Lakeport for a farm tour and tasting; phone ahead for a reservation at 707/263-8131.

Visit discovercaliforniawines.com for information on wine regions, wines and wineries throughout the Golden State and for planning a trip to California wine country.  California is the number one U.S. state for wine and food tourism with dozens of distinct wine regions, 136 American Viticultural Areas and 4,400 wineries that produce 85 percent of U.S. wine. Established in 1934, Wine Institute is the public policy association of nearly 1,000 California wineries.  See: wineinstitute.org.   

A world of flavours – NZ Sauvignon Blanc

Sauvignon Blanc (SB) – they all taste the same dont they?
Certainly at blind tastings, SB’s are easily recognised for their aromatic, pungent aromas and flavours of lime, grass, green apple, green bell pepper and passionfruit…. Yet, delve into a handful of well made SB’s from around the world and you will discover a world of tastes.

Asian Wine Lexicon lists some of the unique aromas/flavours : soursop, starfruit, lemongrass, chives, mungbean and smoked tea alongside the usual guava, basil, gooseberry, peach and boxwood.

 

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Last week, NZ Wine showcased SB’s from all over the country and I was amazed at the differences amongst the SB’s – call it terroir, soil or climatic conditions / winemaking technique but each wine was memorable with a certain personality and character.

Here’s what I mean (tasting notes) by diversity of tastes!:

Seifried SB 2015 from Nelson the sunniest region of NZ – intense with red apples, Chinese pear, herbs, lime and savoury tastes

Amisfield SB 2015 from Central Otago (gravel over loam) , the southernmost region of NZ – passionfruit, grapefruit, crisp with a round sweetish aftertaste

Astrolabe SB 2015 from Awatere Valley (loam over greywacke alluvium) Marlborough, the largest SB producing region – lemongrass, basil leaf, chives, ripe starfruit  and ripe lemons

The Ned SB 2014 from Marlborough – Complex, multi-flavours with tomato leaf and and some Kaffir lime leaf with mungbean

Greywacke Wild SB 2013 from Marlborough – Spicy peppery with steely/smoky tea and fruit nuances

TerraVin Te Ahu SB 2012 from Marlborough – Oak aged with buttery vanilla toast overtones and some beans and green beans and asparagus; with the texture of course.

Various other wines were also available for tasting. Here are some pics.

FullSizeRenderFullSizeRender-1FullSizeRender-6FullSizeRender-4If you wish to find out about NZ wines – click here for NZ Wine

Top Wines 2014/2015 Peak G Wine Awards

2014 – submissions of 300 wines; 100 selected at the top 100 wines in Singapore. Some excellent value wines included Massenez Family Flaviata Cabernet (Red and White International); Donnafugata Tancredi (Cellarmaster Wines); Olsen Personal Reserve Vin 888 Cabernet (Hock Hua Wines); Champagne Fallet Dart Brut Rose (World Wine Vault); Cantine Sant Agata 9.99 Ruche di Castagnole Monferrato (Wine Tatler); Balbi Soprani Barolo 08 (Hock Hua Wines);  Concha Y Toro Marques de Casa concha Pinot (Vina Concha Y Toro Group);  Vina Tabali Pinot (Le Vigne); Georges Duboeuf Morgon ‘JE Descombes’ (Le Vigne); Jean Paul Thevenet Morgon (Artisan Cellars); Casa Santos Lima. Sousao (Viva Vino) ; John Val, Nanny Goat Pinot (Red and White International); Surveyor Thomson Single Vineyard PInot (Singapore Straits Cellars); Pago de los Capellanes, Joven Roble Tinto (Cellarmaster Wines); Paolo e Noemia, Falesia d’amico Chardonnay (Angra Wine & Spirit); Donhoff Riesling Trocken (Wein & Vin) and Olsen Old Bailey Muscadelle (Hock Hua Wines).

Top wines of the year included Marchesi di Barolo, ‘Cannubi’ (Indoguna);  Shaw Vineyard Estate Premium Botrytis Semillon (World Wine Vault) and Van Volxem ‘Alte Reben’ Riesling (Wein & Vin). Other outstanding wines were Mazzei Siepi (SUTL); Misha’s Vineyard Highnote Pinot (Crystal Wines); Henri Billiot Millesime Brut 07 (Artisan Cellars),  and Marques de Riscal Gran Reserva (SUTL).

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2015 –  Wines of the year  were the Askerne Noble Semillon (Hock Hua); Newton Johnson Famile Vineyards Chardonnay (Stellez Vine); Marchesi di Frescobaldi, Luce Della Vite, Luce (Water and Wine). Pick up the 2015 Peak G Wine issue to read the tasting notes the rest of the top 100 wines of 2015

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